Friday, May 29, 2015

Mohawk Nation News 'Creates Criminals Bill: C-51'

CREATES CRIMINALS BILL: C-51

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Please post & distribute. Nia:wen.
MNN. 29, 2015. Stephen Harper’s Bill C-51 outlaws radicalization of Islam, a religion. Rotinoshonni territory is being inundated by two opposite “longhouse” concepts, kaia’nereh:kowa and Handsome Lake.
As the faithkeepers says: "Stay peaceful & pray!"
As the faithkeepers says: “Stay peaceful & pray!”
kaia’nere:kowa, is the law of the land of Great Turtle Island, based on the basic thought and knowledge in how a people relate to the universe. The opening thanksgiving outlines an interdependent system of relations of all elements of nature, which are equal; women are powerful in social, political and economic life; and the people form the base of power. The Great Peace is not a religion. It is our system of consensual decision making.
"Soon, Oren, soon!"
“Soon, Oren, soon!”
The Code People describe Handsome Lake as a religion. It is based on a hierarchical order which goes against the Great Law, which is egalitarian. Their “creator” is a male hierarchical concept based on the Vatican model. Their longhouse where they “pray” is a church without a steeple. It was designed to create division amongst the Rotinoshonni to overtake the law of the land, the kaia’nere:kowa. They prove it by allowing an agent of the CROWN, Aaron Detlor, a bar lawyer, to incorporate them into the Admiralty matrix.
The corporation of Canada developed another way to try to destroy the Great Peace. Canada promotes and provides financing to the Handsome Lake religion in most of the Rotinoshonni communities by subsidizing the building of their longhouses and programs.
Bill C51 was passed to outlaw the radicalization of any religion. Aaron Detlor incorporated the Haudenosaunee Confederacy Council of Chiefs at Six Nations. Canada’s real target is the Great Peace, our legal form of government. It looks to us like they are trying to class anyone following the Great Law as the radicalization of Handsome Lake.
The kaia’ereh:kowa is not affiliated with any building. It is our constitution and it resides in our minds, not in a house. Our source energy is all of creation, the common denominator of the universe. We give thanks to creation, talk to our mother, to our relatives and no one else. No mediator, priest or faithkeeper is needed.
You are welcome in our longhouse.
Oh! You follow the Code! You’re welcome in our longhouse, brother.
Any persons who submit to foreign laws are alienated and subject to death. [Wampum #58].
As REM laments: “That’s me in the corner. That’s me in the spotlight losing my religion. Trying to keep up with you. And I don’t know if I can do it.” [Losing my religion].
MNN Mohawk Nation News kahentinetha@mohawknationnews.com more news, books, workshops, to donate and sign up for MNN newsletters, go towww.mohawknationnews.com  More stories at MNN Archives.  Address:  Box 991, Kahnawake [Quebec, Canada] J0Lthahoketoteh@mohawknationnews.com for original Mohawk music visit thahoketoteh.ws
Satanist bar lawyers.
Corn, beans and squash.


Thursday, May 28, 2015

Mohawk Nation News 'Planet of the Clans'

PLANET OF THE CLANS

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Please post & distribute. Nia:wen.
MNN. May 27, 2015. The clan system will lead to the peace. Women’s power is natural. Their role emulates the earth from whom we get our life and energy.
Women’s power was ignored by the invaders to cut our natural tie to the land and to steal it. Artificial clans were created known as political parties. Men were put at the head based on the corporate hierarchical model of the Vatican.
Is this for real?
Family trees should follow the mother, not the father. 
The clan system cannot be monetized. The corporate party system monetizes everything. The 1% get more from our mother, while the 99% are deprived. Since 1779 the main mission of the CROWN/Vatican is to wipe out the Great Law, kaia’nereh:kowa, so the war continues.
We get our clan from our mother, which can never change. The clans are headed by clan mothers. Through the consensual decision making process our clans come to one mind on all issues. Only the women appoint the leaders of the council of men and have the power to remove their antlers.
iotiyaner, clan mother.
iotiyaner, clan mother.
The party system is based on 51% so they can never come to one mind. Anyone can change their party. Voting is secret and counting is done by the bureaucracy. Stalin said, “It matters not who wins the vote, only who does the counting”.
Haudenosaunee Customs: "What's your clan, m'am?
Haudenosaunee Customs: “What’s your clan, m’am?
The women’s council and the men’s council are equal. The clan mothers act as judges and mediators. The party system head appoints judges to the judiciary. The US Senate is the artificial version of the women’s council made up of men. Congress is the artificial version of the men’s council. A hierarchical president presides over both councils, to make sure war continues. The US in 239 years has had 222 wars.
The women decide issues of citizenship, political office, naming, clan designations and adoptions. Women as judges condemn criminals and dename wrong doers.
Crooked politician.
Poster boy of “artificial party system”! 
The will is the power of the people, which comes from the villages. They are run by the clans headed by the women. We identify ourselves by our mother’s clan. As we all have a clan and the right to have a clan, and a nation, we are tied to our nation by our mother and father. The women consider all matters first, both civil, political and otherwise. Upon reaching a consensus, they send the decision to the men’s council. The men consider the matter, return their decision to the women who review it. No matter is closed as long as anyone female or male wishes to discuss it.
The mental, physical health and domestic peace must be maintained using the tools in the great law of peace. Gaiwiio is ethical behavior in all matters. Women imprint discussions in their memories, having no writing, to tell their children.
'I'm only interested in locating wealthy relatives.'Clans, women’s councils and our fires are the basis of our communities. The rising smoke of our message of peace is seen afar. Decisions are not forced. Every person has a voice on all issues. In the party system 100,000 will give their power to one person for a set time. Our system is based on acknowledgement and respect. Theirs is based solely on money and 51% so war will never end.
When the council of women implement the clan system worldwide, it will shake everything back to its natural order, like the waves will always bring the grains of sand back into the order on the beach. As Muddy Waters wrote and Robert Plant sings: “You know you shook me. You shook me all night long. You shook me, mama”.

MNN Mohawk Nation News kahentinetha@mohawknationnews.com more news, books, workshops, to donate and sign up for MNN newsletters, go towww.mohawknationnews.com  More stories at MNN Archives.  Address:  Box 991, Kahnawake [Quebec, Canada] J0Lthahoketoteh@mohawknationnews.com for original Mohawk music visit thahoketoteh.ws

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Meet Author Julian Kunnie 'Cost of Globalization'

Meet the Author
Julian E Kunnie



at
Barnes & Noble – Foothills Mall
May 30th, 1-5pm
TUCSON, ARIZONA

.


Dr. Julian Kunnie (on far right) at the Indigenous Peoples Border Summit
on Tohono O'odham land, standing on the imaginary border line
with Mohawks, Acoma Pueblo, Dineh, Oneida and Lakota.
Photo Brenda Norrell

Meet the author in Tucson: Dr. Julian Kunnie, who many of you met at the Indigenous Border Summits in Arizona, is the author of 'The Cost of Globalization.' Along with traveling the world from South Africa to China and beyond, Dr. Kunnie has hosted Ofelia Rivas, Tohono O'odham, to speak on the brutality of Border Patrol agents at his classes at the University of Arizona. 
-- Brenda, Censored News

Julian Kunnie is Professor of Religious Studies/Classics at the University of Arizona. He is the author of four books (listed below). His most recent publication is The Cost of Globalization: Dangers to the Earth and Its People(McFarland, April 2015). In addition, he has produced two educational DVDs - Umoya: The Spirit in Africa (2000), which illustrates the dynamic growth of Indigenous Churches in Africa; and Black and Brown: An Afro-Latino Journey (2006), which explores the ancient African presence in Mexico. He produced two DVDs in 2011, aided by Veronica Martinez - We Belong to Mother Earth: Dineh Elder and Hataali Jones Benally Speaks and The Global Indigenous Peoples Performing Arts Festival, from Pingtung, Taiwan, following his research visit to Taiwan and China in August 2011.
He has delivered papers and lectures at colleges, universities, and communities on six continents. Kunnie is currently working on a prison research project that interrogates issues of race, class, and gender and is geared toward preventing the incarceration of youth, particularly those of color. He has visited Napierville Correctional Facility in South Africa and San Quentin Correctional Facility in California for his research. He recently launched the Nyakweri Ecological Restoration and Preservation Project with Samwel Naikada from Transmara, Kenya, that is concerned with studying the impact of global warming and climate change on the Nyakweri Forest Preserve. The project trains students in areas of ecological sustainability through practical immersion and living in the Nyakweri forest.
Over the years and during his tenure as Professor and Director of Africana Studies at the UA, Kunnie pioneered/taught courses in Africana Philosophy, History, Political Economy, Geography, Psychology, History of Religions, Racism and Social Change, and Aesthetics of Dance. He currently teaches courses in African/Indigenous Religions, African American Religion, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., and is planning to teach a new course on Indigenous Religions, Buddhism, and Christianity in 2012.
Recent Publications:

Ecuador's Indigenous to confront Chevron in shareholder meeting for rainforest damage and lies

By 350 Bay Area
Censored News

Protest at Chevron Annual Shareholders Meeting, Wednesday 7:00 am
Chevron_Toxico.jpgWith evidence mounting that Chevron falsified evidence to evade paying a $9.5 billion pollution liability in Ecuador, Chevron CEO John Watson faces an embarrassing public reprimand this week from an Ecuadorian indigenous leader who has traveled from the rainforest to the company's annual meeting to confront top management with proof that it has gone rogue in the long-running litigation.
Humberto Piaguaje, a leader of Ecuador's Secoya indigenous tribe, will enter the company's annual meeting Wednesday as a shareholder with a proxy. He'll raise the issue of a new forensic report that proves Chevron's star witness lied under oath and explosive internal company videos that suggest Chevron scientists tried to defraud Ecuador's courts to evade a court-mandated clean-up of oil contamination that has afflicted Ecuador's rainforest for decades.
Join us on May 27th at Chevron's Annual Shareholder meeting as we take our demands to Chevron's doorstep and stand in solidarity with shareholders calling for a change in Chevron’s culture of deception, corruption and destruction.
RSVP for Chevron Shareholders Protest, 7:00 am Wedneday, May 27 at 350 Bay Area or on Facebook

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Words of Compañera Selena, Zapatista Listener



2015

Words of Compañera Selena, Listener

Words of Compañera Selena, Listener,i

Good evening compañeros and compañeras of the Sixth.
Good evening brothers and sisters.
Good evening to everyone in general.
The topic that I will be explaining to you, actually I will read it to you, is the same topic the other compañera presented on, but with more information about the youth, both Zapatistas and non-Zapatistas.
We as Zapatista youth are facing a low intensity war that the bad government and the bad capitalists wage against us. They put ideas into our heads about modern life, like cellphones, clothes, and shoes; they put these bad ideas into our heads through TV, through soap operas, soccer games, and commercials, so that we as youth will be distracted and not think about how to organize our struggle.
But we Zapatista youth have not often fallen for this, because despite these attempts when we do buy clothes they are not the stylish ones; we buy the kind of clothes the poor wear, which as you can see is how we are dressed right now. We also buy shoes, but they are just a whatever kind of shoe, like the poor use; we don’t buy the kind with the pointy heels. If we were to use that kind of shoe, well where we live there is a lot of mud, and if we young women wear these shoes we’re going to get stuck, and we’re going to have to use our hand to get the shoe out. We also don’t buy those leather boots because the same thing can happen, they can come unglued in the mud because they are not strong enough; yes, of course we buy boots, but they are work boots, the kind that resist the mud, we don’t buy shoes that don’t resist.
And we also buy cellphones, but we know how to use them like Zapatistas, for something useful. We also have TV, but we use it to listen to the news, not to distract ourselves.
We did buy these things, but first we had to sweat and work the mother earth to be able to buy what we wanted.
On the other hand, youth who are not Zapatistas are those who most often fall for the tricks of the bad government, because believe it or not, those poor-poor youth abandon their families, their community, and they go to work in the United States, to Playa del Carmen, or to other countries, just to be able to buy that cellphone, that pair of pants, shirt, or stylish shoe. They leave because they don’t want to work the earth, because they are lazy. Why do we say they are poor-poor? Because they are poor like us; but they are also poor thinkers because they leave their communities and when they come back they bring bad ideas with them, other ways of living. They come back with ideas to assault or rob others, to consume and plant marijuana; and when they get back to their houses they say they do not want to work with the machete because they’re no longer used to it; that it would be better to go back again to where they were, that they no longer want to drink pozol,ii they say they don’t even know what pozol is anymore, even though they grew up with pozol, with beans. They pretend, in those places where they go, that they aren’t familiar with the food of the poor; they pretend to be children of rich folk, but this is a lie; they are poor like us.
On the other hand, we Zapatistas are poor, but rich in thinking. Why? Because even though we have shoes and clothes and cellphones, we don’t change our thinking or our way of life, because to us as Zapatista youth it doesn’t matter to us how we are dressed, or what kinds of things we have. What’s important to us is that the work we do is for the good of the community. That is what we Zapatistas want, and it’s what we want for the whole world: that there not be rulers, that there not be exploiters, that we as indigenous people are not exploited.
I’m not sure if you understood what I read.
Well, that was all the words I wanted to share with you, hopefully they are useful to you.
i The Zapatistas use the Spanish “Escucha,” meaning listener, to refer to an assigned position or responsibility, often given to young people, to go and listen at a meeting, gathering, or event and report back to others in the Zapatista communities who were not in attendance.
ii A drink made from ground maize mixed with water and often consumed in the Mexican countryside as a midmorning or midday meal

Words of Compañera Lizbeth, Zapatista base of support

Words of Compañera Lizbeth, Zapatista base of support

"We have the courage to struggle'

Good evening compañeros and compañeras, brothers and sisters.
We are going to explain a little bit of how we have been living and doing our autonomous work after the 1994 armed uprising.
We as Zapatista youth today, we are no longer familiar with the overseer, with the landowner, with the hacienda boss, much less with El Amate [a prison in Chiapas]; we do not know what it is to go to the official municipal presidents so that they can resolve our problems. Thanks to the EZLN organization, we now have our own authorities in each community, we have our municipal authorities, and our Juntas de Buen Gobierno [Good Government Councils], and they resolve whatever type of problem that might arise for a compañera or compañero, for both Zapatistas and non-Zapatistas.
We now have freedom and rights as women, to have opinions, discuss, and analyze, which is not how it was before, as the other compañera said.
The problem we still have is that we are shy about participating or explaining how we are working, but we compañerasare in fact doing the work.
Also, we women are already participating in all types of work, such as in the area of health, doing ultrasounds, laboratory work, pap smears, colposcopies, dentistry, and clinic work. We also participate in what we call the three areas, which includes midwifery, bone-setting, and medicinal plants.
We are also working in education as formadoras [teacher trainers] and coordinators, and education promotoras [like a teacher, literally “promoter”].
We have women broadcasters and members of the Tercios Compas [Zapatista media team].
We participate in compañera collectives, in women’s gatherings, and youth gatherings.
We are also participating as municipal authorities, which includes many different kinds of work, and we women do these tasks. We are also working in the Juntas de Buen Gobierno as local authorities, and as board members for thecompañeras’ businesses.
In different autonomous work areas, we are already participating alongside our compañeros. Although we as young women don’t know how to govern yet, we are named to be community authorities because they see that we know how to read and write a little bit, and then we learn the rest through doing the work.
In the majority of the work that we carry out we are all young women, and we can tell you clearly that this work is hard, it is not easy. But if we have the courage to struggle, we can do these tasks where the people rule and the government obeys.
Now, men and women practice this form of struggle and of government every single day. We now see this as our culture.
That is all I wanted to say, compañeros and compañeras.

Monday, May 25, 2015

Zapatistas Comandanta Dalia 'Waking up to the good fight'



2015

Comandanta Dalia

Comandanta Dalia

Good evening compañeros and compañeras, brothers and sisters.
I’m going to explain a little bit of what compañera Comandanta Rosalinda said.
Just as she explained, it is now my turn to talk about how we become authorities. From 1994 on, we knew that we had rights as women. That was when we woke up. This is how little by little we grew to understand the work of the compañeras.
In the communities, in the regions, we began the practice of organizing ourselves to fight for the good of the community, without having to have an education to do so.
In 1994, we realized that as women, as mothers and fathers, we had the courage to send our husbands, our sons, our daughters to fight, and we knew well that to confront the enemy is not easy and one can come back alive or dead. But we never dwelled on those things. We were clear that the women had the responsibility to raise whomever of our sons and daughters were left. This is when we understood that we thought the same way as the compañeros.
To be a suplenta [the second or substitute to an authority position], first one has to do the work, to give talks about the struggle. We came to see that there were more responsibilities for doing that work. There are meetings in the regions, municipalities, and zones. There are frequent visits to the communities to better organize the compañeras andcompañeros in the collective work to sustain the resistance throughout the lands we recovered in 1994, which had been taken away from us by the large landowners. Since the time of clandestinity, we were doing collective work, and also giving talks in each community, to men, women, boys and girls, so that they could understand the struggle.
This was so our children didn’t grow up with these bad ideas; we don’t let them learn these bad ideas from the capitalist system.
This is how the work of the compañeras and their participation as Zapatistas kept advancing in all types of work and in any responsibility given to them by the community. In this way, the compañeras came to recognize their rights, that we do have this freedom, the freedom to give opinions, to analyze, to discuss, to plan, on any topic, and in that way the compañeros also understood the rights of women.
The first courage the compañeras showed was to permit their spouses and daughters to be in the struggle. Secondly, they gave their husbands this freedom, because we saw what the men were doing, and that as women we could also do that; we have that courage.
We also have words to offer, ideas to analyze, ways to look at problems. Even though it was very difficult for us, we made the effort. Even though the compañero men were bastards before, we knew how to get them to understand; there are a few that still act like little jerks sometimes, but now it’s not all of them.
But the majority now understand. The compañeras don’t just let it go, they don’t remain humiliated like before, and like compañera Comandanta Miriam said, now the women bring their complaints to the civilian authorities, such as theagentas or comisariadas [local autonomous authorities]. In each community we have agentas and comisariadas, and if it can’t be resolved by the agentas and comisariadas, it goes to the municipal authorities. They are able to resolve things according to the rules and agreements we have in each community.
But don’t think that all of the compañeras complain because they are scared of their spouses; rather, it is important to know these things and talk between compañeras. Whenever we have meetings people begin to talk, and wecompañeras have to investigate. That is, we have to figure out how to fix things ourselves, because amongst ourselves we have a lot of patience, not like the men who don’t have patience.
So we saw that yes, we could do the work, and now we take the time and space to participate, and to train another generation, even if we make errors in the process. But if we make mistakes, we fix them ourselves. In this way, we are making our struggle, and we continue organizing; we have a lot of patience as women, which is why we move from local authorities, regional authorities, candidata, suplenta, to becoming part of the Indigenous Revolutionary Clandestine Committee [CCRI].
To better organize the compañeras and to help the youth understand more, we have to orient, convince, to be a kind of matchmaker and infect them, not with illness but with good ideas. It’s not a bad idea to help them understand that they shouldn’t live exploited by the capitalist system; this is what we are doing, and the young people are already organizing. And it’s just like you see here, present with us are these two compañeritas, young compañeras. Their names are Selena and Lizbeth; they are going to be our future authorities, fruits of their generation.
We are doing this in steps, steps without an end; that is why we are here as the CCRI with the Sixth Commission. Thanks to the organization, we have learned to read a little bit, to write a little bit, to speak a bit of Spanish. Before we didn’t know how to speak even one word in Spanish. This is why we are not going to stop organizing as women in this capitalist system, because there is still sadness, pain, imprisonment, and rape. Just as the mothers of the missing 43 do not stop organizing.
This is why we are sharing with you brothers and sisters of the national and international Sixth. Thanks to our Zapatista organization, we Zapatista women are now taken into account; we men and women organize together because of the bad capitalist system.
We want change in everything, in the entire world, for the whole country. But if we don’t organize ourselves, and if we don’t fight against the capitalist system, it will continue until it finishes us all off; there will never be a change.
We need to be fighting at 100%, men and women. To have a new society where the people rule. We as Zapatista women are not going to stop fighting, even as the bad government kills us, because the bad governments are always persecuting us.
I’m sorry compañeros and compañeras, brothers and sisters, I don’t know how to speak Spanish very well. Since I don’t know it well, I hope you’ve heard what I said.
That’s all.
Thank you.

Also see: 
Comandanta Rosalinda 'Revolution requires women and men'
http://www.bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2015/05/zapatista-comandanta-rosalinda.html
Comandanta Miriam 'On the Rights of Women'
http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2015/05/zapatista-comandanta-miriam-on-rights.html

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